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Home renovation is back in the spotlight after a van home fire

Updated October 08, 2018 10:15:48 The blaze that gutted a home in Surrey, Canada, has prompted an urgent reopening of the project to address concerns about the health and safety of its occupants.

The incident has prompted calls for the building’s owners to be more open about what happened and whether it was a random fire or an attempt to gain entry to the property.

The owner of the house, John and Mary Hodges, have been forced to take down the walls of the home, which they had been living in since 2013.

The Hodgeses say they have been told by the city to be sure they have the proper permit and have been advised by a health officer to stay in the home as much as possible, which means they have left the house and are waiting for the police to come and inspect it.

“I don’t know what to think.

It’s a very difficult decision,” said John Hodges.

“We were supposed to be staying in the house but the police took it down and they’re now here to get us.

It has been very difficult and it has been a lot of stress for the family.” “

This is something that’s very difficult for me to take and it’s been very emotional for all of us.

It has been very difficult and it has been a lot of stress for the family.”

The Hodgers, who are from London, England, moved to Canada about four years ago, and the family moved into the van home in 2013 after renting a house in Surrey for seven years.

The building’s owner has been under a media fire following the incident.

“It’s sad to hear the news and I think it’s very unfortunate.

It would be really difficult to keep our house safe,” said Mr Hodges of the building that he had to demolish.

“That’s why we had to take it down.

We’re going to have to go and have a safety check and it will take a while for us to get into the house again.”

The house was built in the 1920s.

It is not known what caused the fire.

The house has been repaired, the owners are receiving compensation and the Hodges family is receiving an insurance payout.

The fire broke out in the kitchen area, and there is a water line on the kitchen floor.

The owners of the Hodgers’ house have also been told to ensure they have proper safety measures in place to protect themselves from the heat of the fire, such as covering the window with a towel.

They have also asked for more public education about what is expected of people living in residential buildings.

“They’re being told by them to be very careful about the fire risk and not to go into the building, to be careful about putting their own things in the building and to keep it closed,” said Mrs Hodges with tears in her eyes.

Mr Hodgers says he’s been told the city is taking steps to make sure residents have the right permits, but there has been no official notification from the city of the changes. “

You can’t have that risk if you can’t make sure you’re doing everything you can to protect yourself.”

Mr Hodgers says he’s been told the city is taking steps to make sure residents have the right permits, but there has been no official notification from the city of the changes.

“All of the city has been on it, they’re not just the building owners,” he said.

“Everything is going on.

There are a lot more benefits to living in the city than they might think.” “

People are getting paid.

There are a lot more benefits to living in the city than they might think.”

He says he has been asked to stay with his family until the building is re-inspected and then he will be moving on.

“Our whole life we have had to go to work.

We’ve been working in Surrey since 2013 and then moved to Ottawa and now here,” he added.

There is no explanation for it. “

What’s going on with the city and the building?

There is no explanation for it.

The only thing I can understand is that they don’t want people living there and they want to get rid of the problem.”

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